International Women’s Day: How the pandemic transformed some of America’s top female execs, including DEG’s Amy Jo Smith

International Women’s Day: How the pandemic transformed some of America’s top female execs, including DEG’s Amy Jo Smith

(Above) DEG’s Amy Jo Smith in her home office, where she’ll continue to work after the pandemic.

 

March 8, 2021 | Working from home while caring for family during a deadly pandemic has been transformational for many women — and often not in a good way. With few child care options and increased demands at home, more than 2 million women have dropped out of the workforce entirely. And millions more are still struggling to maintain a work-life balance they can live with. Even many women in high-level leadership roles — despite the privileges that come with their jobs — were forced to reassess their priorities.

Here’s how the pandemic has changed three women executives’ views on their careers and their lives.

Eager to spend more time working from home

For years, Amy Jo Smith logged 150,000 miles of air travel annually going to Europe, Asia and various US cities in her role as president and CEO of the Digital Entertainment Group, a trade association for the home entertainment industry. When not traveling, her daily work routine meant getting up by 5:30 am, taking her daughter to school and arriving at the office between 7 am and 7:30 am.

But the past year has taught Smith she has no interest in resuming such a punishing schedule. Now she gets up, works out, has breakfast with her 16-year-old daughter, and then starts working from her home office.

Read more on CNN Business.